“Broken Falls” – The Ireland/Newfoundland Connection

My debut novel Broken Falls is set in a fictional village in Newfoundland populated by people of Irish descent. In the course of my research, I realised that there is a very strong link between Ireland and Newfoundland. According to Wikipedia:

In modern Newfoundland, many Newfoundlanders are of Irish descent. According to the Statistics Canada 2006 census, 21.5% of Newfoundlanders claim Irish ancestry. The family names, the features and colouring, the predominance of Catholics in some areas (particularly on the southeast portion of the Avalon Peninsula), the prevalence of Irish music, even the accents of the people in these areas, are so reminiscent of rural Ireland that Irish author Tim Pat Coogan has described Newfoundland as “the most Irish place in the world outside of Ireland”. Newfoundland has been called “the other Ireland”.

Nowhere is the connection between the two countries more evident than in the South East of Ireland. The website “Waterford In Your Pocket” picks up the story:

When the fishing industry started to flourish in Newfoundland, Canada, then the ships started looking for people that were willing and able to work. This all started in the 1700s. Men from the South East of Ireland, many of them farmer’s sons with no experience of fishing, would travel to Newfoundland for the summer fishing season and return home for the winter. The interesting point is that all these men lived where there was easy access to Waterford city and that was along the Three Sisters, the rivers Suir, Nore, and Barrow.

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It has been said that between 1800 and 1830, over 35,000 people from the South East of Ireland, with a radius of about fifty miles around Waterford City, settled in a thinly populated Newfoundland. It was in essence a population transplant from the South East to Newfoundland.

Today the fishing is not what it used to be in Newfoundland but the ties are still there.  If you were walking down a street in St John’s you would think that you were walking through the streets of Waterford or any town in the south east.

Indeed, I witnessed this myself when I took a research trip to Newfoundland for Broken Falls. My trip took me to the Irish Loop (situated on the above-mentioned Avalon Peninsula). In one village in particular, I encountered people who had never left Newfoundland, but who had a stronger Waterford accent than me. This town would become my fictional “Broken Falls”.

The video below will give you some idea of how the Irish accent has endured in Newfoundland.

Broken Falls is on sale now in paperback and on Kindle on Amazon UK and Amazon US

 

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“Broken Falls” – Read A Free Excerpt!

My debut novel, Broken Falls, is on sale now. Here’s the blurb:

“Wyoming cop, John Ryan, receives a package of letters from a recently deceased priest addressed to John’s late father begging his forgiveness, for something the priest had done. Unravelling the story behind the letters leads John to the remote fishing village of Broken Falls, Newfoundland, a place filled with strange and colourful characters, whose secrets are as old as the village itself. As he attempts to find out what it was the dead priest did – and how he died – John must confront his own past and the secrets that his father tried so hard to hide.”

Sound interesting? Well now you can read an excerpt from it! Check it out below.

 

Broken Falls is on sale now in paperback and on Kindle on Amazon UK and Amazon US

“Broken Falls” Book Trailer – A Thriller Teaser!

 

BrokenFalls

My debut novel, Broken Falls, is on sale now. Here’s the blurb:

“Wyoming cop, John Ryan, receives a package of letters from a recently deceased priest addressed to John’s late father begging his forgiveness, for something the priest had done. Unravelling the story behind the letters leads John to the remote fishing village of Broken Falls, Newfoundland, a place filled with strange and colourful characters, whose secrets are as old as the village itself. As he attempts to find out what it was the dead priest did – and how he died – John must confront his own past and the secrets that his father tried so hard to hide.”

And it’s got it’s very own book trailer! Check it out below.

 

Broken Falls is on sale now in paperback and on Kindle on Amazon UK and Amazon US

 

 

My Debut Novel “Broken Falls”

BrokenFalls

There’s an old writing maxim that you should always save or jot down any interesting articles or stories that you see. This was certainly true in my case. A news article that I read many years ago became the basis for my debut novel, Broken Falls, which is now on sale.

The article in question was innocuous enough. It was about a town in Nova Scotia that boasts the largest percentage of Irish speakers outside the Gaeltacht in Ireland. For some reason, I found this fascinating. And almost immediately, my writer brain kicked into gear.

What would it be like, I wondered, if an American cop was to visit this town, perhaps investigating a murder? What would he make of these people and their strange tongue? Right then, I had the basis for my story – a stranger in a strange land.

When I sat down to write it, however, I immediately encountered my first problem. I couldn’t have the people in my story actually speaking Irish: it would appeal to a niche market, to say the least. So I started to look elsewhere for my strange land. I found it – not too far from Nova Scotia – on the East coast of Newfoundland, in an area called the Irish Loop. Here were nestled small communities of people descended from the Irish fisherman who left southern Ireland in search of the cod-rich waters off the Newfoundland coast. It was said they still had the Irish brogue.

I visited Newfoundland shortly before I started my book and found that this was indeed the case. In one village in particular, I encountered people who had never left Newfoundland, but who had a stronger Waterford accent than me. This town would become my fictional “Broken Falls”.

And the story would end up as follows:

“When Wyoming cop, John Ryan, receives a package of letters from a recently deceased priest addressed to John’s late father and begging for his forgiveness, unravelling the story behind them leads John to the remote fishing village of Broken Falls, Newfoundland, a place filled with strange and colourful characters, whose secrets are as old as the village itself. As he attempts to find out what it was the dead priest did – and how he died – John must confront his own past and the secrets that his father tried so hard to hide.”

You can buy Broken Falls on Amazon.com and on Amazon.co.uk

We Are the New Resistance

leia

In the past twenty-four hours, Bruce Springsteen spoke for the first time about the inauguration of Donald Trump. He said:

“… our hearts and spirits are with the hundreds of thousands of women and men that marched yesterday in every city in America … who rallied against hate and division and in support of tolerance, inclusion, reproductive rights, civil rights, racial justice, LGBTQ rights, the environment, wage equality, gender equality, healthcare, and immigrant rights. We stand with you. We are the new American resistance.”

Over on this side of the world, we may not be the “American” resistance, but we can still be the resistance.

Since, Trump’s election, we’ve heard a lot about how we should “give him a chance”, to “see what he’s going to do.” Well, it’s now mere days after the election and we’ve already seen what he’s going to do. His administration has removed web pages from the official White House website related to civil rights, climate change, and LGBT issues. Hours after taking office, he signed an executive order beginning the repeal of the Affordable Care Act that will strip millions of Americans of their health insurance. And his press secretary’s first act was to blatantly lie to the American people about the numbers in attendance at the inauguration (a lie that was later described by another Trump lackey as “alternative facts”, adding another terrifying piece of 1984-speak to the language).

We may not have the power of the Presidential office – or of the American Senate and House of Representatives – but we are not powerless.

We can march. Estimates put the number of people who attended the #WomensMarch at three times the amount who attended the inauguration.

picwomensmarchboston170121a_0167w

To quote Bruce again, we can “bear witness and testify”. Writing blog posts, sharing information on social media. We can highlight the injustices this administration perpetuates, expose their lies, and disseminate the truth.

We can satirise. As we’ve seen time and again, if there’s one thing Trump (like all demagogues) can’t stand, it’s satire. Write your jokes, spread your memes, expose him for the thin-skinned charlatan that he is.

Marching, speaking out, sharing information, satirising – these are the weapons in our arsenal.

We are the new resistance. And the fight has just begun.

 

BuskAid – What’s It All About, Alfie?

If you follow me on social media, you may have seen me mentioning something called “BuskAid” over the past few weeks. So what is “BuskAid”?

“BuskAid” was the brainchild of Tadhg Williams – musician, activist, and – yes – busker. The problem of homelessness reached crisis point in Ireland in 2016. The most recent figures show that 6,985 people are homeless in Ireland at the moment. Tadhg had just attended a fundraiser for homeless charities in a local Waterford bar and, afterwards, he wondered what more the musicians of Waterford could do.

tadhg

The response was – as they say – overwhelming. Tadhg enlisted my help along with three other poor misfortunates – Anna Jordan, Alan Daly Mulligan, and Meg Walsh – and together we set about organising Ireland’s first citywide busk for charity.

In three weeks!

But we needn’t have worried. The people and businesses of Waterford quickly rowed in behind us. A huge amount of volunteers and buskers signed up, and numerous local businesses offered their support – everything from sponsorship and designing posters, to offering free coffee to everyone involved on the day.

The day itself started out wet and miserable, but nonetheless, the buskers and volunteers got stuck in straight away. And then – around noon – the rain stopped and blue skies appeared. From there on in, more and more buskers and volunteers in yellow sweatshirts popped up in various spots around the city.

The day was hectic, glorious and inspirational. We had set an initial target of €3,000. Even that might have been an optimistic figure, given that this was a makeshift organisation with just three weeks to organise. As it turned out, we exceeded that, raising €4,000. We can’t thank enough our wonderful buskers, volunteers, and the people of Waterford who – once again – showed their generosity.

We’re not kidding ourselves. BuskAid won’t solve the homeless crisis. But, at a time when the Irish Government seems unwilling to do what needs to be done, it is up to the Irish people to take matters into their own hands. A group called “Home Sweet Home” did that in Dublin recently when they occupied a vacant building owned by the State and turned it into a homeless shelter. And #BuskAid did it in Waterford on Friday Dec 23.

And we’ll be doing it again in 2017. Bigger and better. Stay tuned!

Sending the Elevator Back Down

spacey

I teach guitar in a music club.

This isn’t a subject that I’ve written about a lot before, which is odd, considering that it’s been a major part of my life for the last few years. I suppose it’s something I’ve sometimes taken for granted.

But there are times when something happens that you stop and realise – actually this is a wonderful thing. A few nights ago, the club where I teach guitar (Klub Muzik in Tramore, Co. Waterford) won a Waterford Community & Voluntary Award, which is a great honour.

This set me thinking about what a wonderful thing it is for me – and for my fellow tutors – to pass on the gift of something we love to the next generation. Kevin Spacey has this great quote: “If you’re lucky enough to do well, it’s your responsibility to send the elevator back down.” And while I’m not appearing on “House of Cards”, or onstage at the Old Vic, I think the same applies to anyone who has mastered their craft (to whatever extent).

I had a conversation to that effect on Twitter with YA novelist Dave Rudden recently, and I hope he won’t mind me quoting him here. As Dave put it, you’re “facilitating other people getting to experience something you love. You’re literally re-experiencing your own introduction to an artform you love. It’s amazing.”

And Dave’s not wrong – it really is. I teach guitar to kids ranging in age from 9 or 10 to teenagers. The common denominator with all is a love of playing music. And there is nothing like it.

And yes, as I’ve said, sometimes you take it for granted. Until that is, you teach a song to a young kid and you can see the excitement in their eyes and they say, “I’m gonna go home and play this song all night.” Or you hear a parent say how much their child is loving their guitar class. Or you watch a student of yours get up on stage with their first band and belt it out. And it may not sound perfect but it doesn’t matter because they’re doing something creative, something that they love, and they’ll eventually get there. And, after all (cliché alert!) it’s not about the destination, it’s about the journey. (And that’s one cliché that’s actually true.)

One of the many things that the club where I teach does is to bring together various students of different instruments to form bands. Recently, I was lucky enough to be responsible for forming one of these bands. They don’t have a name yet (and we still need a bass player) but we have two guitarists, a drummer, and a male and female vocalist. And they sound great. And they are loving it. It’s such a buzz for me to stand in that room and watch them give their all – singing and playing their hearts out. Because I remember when I was their age, listening to Springsteen or U2 in my bedroom, trying to play along on my crappy electric guitar, and dreaming of getting up on stage or recording an album like them.

But the thing is – and here’s the kicker – I never had a music club like ours. I never had a place that could teach me guitar, and then, when I was confident enough, could offer me a practice room to play in with my band where all the amps and drums, etc. were provided. That would have been like Nirvana for us! (The state of mind, not the band. Although, I’m sure the band would have appreciated it too.) And that’s why we need to see more of these kinds of music clubs. Every county, every parish has their GAA club. And that’s a wonderful thing. But not every kid wants to play sports. There needs to be an outlet for the ones who just want to sing, or play their guitar, or bang their drums.

I’ve been lucky enough to get up on a few stages, and record a few albums, and I want to send the elevator back down. But the elevator’s not going down without me on board. Because I want to see their faces when they figure out how to play that song they love, and they think “Yes. This is what I’ve been waiting for.”